Millennials: our ITSM future

This is too good not to share:

ISACA's long cultural road

Will ISACA ever shed the audit-and-security culture and embrace a more general IT practitioner orientation as promised by Lynn Lawton four years ago now?

Can COBIT ever be more than a sideshow if they don't? No.

Let's not underestimate the resilience of people and societies

© Can Stock Photo Chicken ITle and I have had it up to here with those who see people and society as a passive bus-load of zombies trundling towards whatever dreadful fate they are frothing up today, whether it be global warming, or robots doing us out of a job. We aren't helpless and we aren't mindless. We adjust, we respond, we correct, we react - as individuals and as communities and societies. The only thing mindless is the use of extrapolation to predict the future. We should do better than that.

The applicability of factory-floor techniques to IT

In my review of The Phoenix Project I questioned the applicability of factory-floor techniques to IT. There is potential to be exploited there - hence I recommended everyone read the book - but we can go too far with the application of Lean, TQM, Six Sigma etc to IT. Manufacturing techniques are only partly applicable.

The future of ITIL and PRINCE2

The Capita/UK Govt JV is having a planning session on 23rd May. This is your opportunity to suggest agenda items. Don't mess about with paragraph numbering or translating into Bulgarian. Here's what I suggested.

How do we feel about ITIL being a commercial product?

ITIL has been sold (and Prince2 - the following discussion applies just as much to all of the "Swirl" products sold). It is a commercial product. No more half-way house with OGC outsourcing publishing and accreditation: they've gone the whole hog and flogged the Swirl suite off for the corporate shilling. (First example of this in the UK Government apparently and supposedly a model for more.) How do we feel about this new situation?

The guitar; a little parable about IT technology

ImageThe guitar: a little parable about how people approach IT technology.

A bulletin from the castle

I wrote last week about how we are in the dark over the new joint venture between her Majesty's UK Government and Capita owning the "Swirl portfolio": ITIL, Prince2 and assorted other IP products.

A bulletin (pdf) has fluttered down from the castle wall today.

ITIL, Prince2, Capita and the Cabinet Office - in the dark

Lots of people are asking what the IT Skeptic makes of the recent announcement of a joint venture between the Cabinet Office and Capita to exploit the Best Practice Library. They're asking why I haven't made any comment yet. Two reasons: (1) I was off-grid for 10 days and (2) we haven't been given any information useful enough to draw many conclusions. Clearly the behaviour I call "Castle ITIL" will continue: you will be informed when they are good and ready to announce by decree, and until then the castle gates remain firmly shut. But I have been able to glean a few things...

The UK Government reinvents ITSM

How exactly does the UK Government spend time and money building a "Government Service Design Manual" targeted at builders of the Gov.uk online services that only once mentions ITIL?

And how does Gov.uk think that essential public services like passports, BD&M, benefits, justice, citizenship and tax are going to run with "Resources for service managers" that barely summarise the syllabus of an ITIL Foundations course?

DevOps ideology and dangerous over-simplification, that's how.

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