ITIL

The IT Infrastructure Library www.itil.co.uk

COBIT 5 will be released in April

ISACA have announced to members that COBIT 5 will be released in "mid-April".

The release includes three publications:

  • COBIT 5 (Framework)
  • COBIT 5: Enabling Processes
  • COBIT 5 Implementation

...and a "toolkit", an undefined "set of resources". I smell spreadsheets.

Cost to ISACA members for the pdf version? Nada. Free. Suck on that Cabinet Office/TSO/itSMF.

And ISACA is providing a separate download server for members so as not to have to compete for bandwidth with the great unwashed masses.

the value of ITIL certification

ITSM Portal raises the question of the value of ITIL certifications. To me they aren't worth much.

The uselessness of ITIL process maturity assessment

I'm looking at a "classic" process maturity assessment done by a consulting firm for a client, and what a useless document it is. I'm not saying who sent it to me or why or where from. That isn't important here because so many assessments are similar. Compare yours.

The report analyses 8 practices. It doesn't say why those eight. ITIL has 27 or so, COBIT about 40. They are a typical eight: Incident, Request, Problem, Change, SACM, SLM, Knowledge, Catalogue.

ITIL doesn't add overhead

I'm intrigued by the endless repetition of the chant "ITIL slows things down". No it doesn't. Doing things properly slows things down.

The difference between ITIL and COBIT for consultants: four words

As a consultant, COBIT is my first-choice body of knowledge for my engagements. I go to it first* to assess, to frame, to define, to justify, to audit. I turn to ITIL second, when I need more detail, or when I need the authority of the holy of holies to justify what I suggest. There are two reasons for this:

The state of ITIL

Some time ago I did some research for APMG on the state of ITIL. Now the resulting white paper has been published.

ITIL training fun and games at itSMFUK conference - and an end to competition?

The IT Skeptic hears on the grapevine that the ITIL training industry may be having a few meetings of its own at the itSMF UK conference next week. And the topics of conversation may bear on the continued competition between Examination Institutes (EIs).

Lean IT and ITIL

One sees a few remarks in the webisphere that suggest folk don't get the relationship between Lean IT and ITIL (thanks to my friend Bob Grinsell, RIPOFF #1, for reminding me of this issue by his comment on the itSMF USA forum). Lean is a method. ITIL is a framework. These are different things for different purposes.

Riddle me this: matching ITIL theory to the real world

Calling all you ITIL theorists, philosophers, pontificators and pundits. Marty is back: our follower from the real world, trying to make sense of ITIL on its home grounds, the operations of big iron batch computing. Marty asks what happens after a service is restored? What does ITIL call the function of undoing the damage done while a service was unavailable? I have a view - of course - but I'm going to stay quiet - for a while- and hear what everyone else thinks. So have at it.

Does ITIL explain the difference between an Alert and an Event?

Help me please. I'm thrashing around in the morass of Service Operation, trying to get crystal clear on the difference/relationship between an Alert and an Event. Anyone?

P.S. we did skirt around this discussion before

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